Work-Life Equation Should Include Dads

Phil Dunphy, America’s Favorite Working Dad

I don’t think this will shock you, but work-life needs are not just for women.

So says a new series of studies from the Boston College Center for Work & Family in the Carroll School of Management. (Lauren Stiller Rikleen provides a nice overview of these studies’ findings over at the Harvard Business Review blog. If you’re interested, please do give it a read.)

I’m really glad these studies were done and published, and I hope people in power will take note. Things like flexible work, childcare, maternity/paternity leave, family leave and other work-related “life” issues apply to moms and dads (and to non-parents as well, in many cases).

From my own perspective, I’ve worked with and known dads of all stripes — from those career-focused, old-school douches who treat their kids like little mini-me desk trophies to super-loving, nurturing modern dads who will drop everything to pick up their sick kid or attend a parent-teacher conference. I’m happy to report, the dads I currently work with fall into super-loving end of the spectrum (at least, as far as I know).

I don’t get the vibe from my coworkers, management or corporate overlords that dads’ work-life needs matter less or more than moms.’ It feels equal, and that feels right.

I’d love to hear from other WMAGs out there about this issue. How does your own baby-daddy view the intersection of fatherhood and career? How about your colleagues in the fatherly way?


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Susan
Susan Wenner Jackson is a writer and mom who gets paid to obsess over Pinterest and blogs for Ahalogy, a Cincinnati-based startup. She lives in her hometown of West Chester, Ohio, with her husband, two young children, and their dog.
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Comments

  1. More and more, ask the Baby Boomers age, people are going to be burdened with caring for older parents in much the same way that they needed to care for children. Men will be affected by this equally, I hope. So employers will need to pay even more attention to work-life balance for both sexes. Again, I hope.

  2. Hi Susan-
    I really like this website (except for the color-scheme), and think it is really important.

    I particularly agree with this post. From my personal experience as an involved dad juggling work and family, the experiences of my friends, as well as my academic and professional experience in this area (I’m a management professor who conducts research on fathers and work-family), there is a HUGE pent-up demand for recognizing work and family as a men’s issue, as well.

    Slowly but surely, society and many employers are starting to recognize this.

    -Scott Behson
    (sorry for the plug, but it is actually relevant here- I started a blog about 2 months ago on this very topic- FathersWorkandFamily.com. You may find it an interesting complement to yours.)

    • Hi Scott,

      Thanks for chiming in! Even if our content is surrounded in a sea of pink :)

      I look forward to checking out your blog. Please come back often!

      Susan

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